Close

Not a member yet? Register now and get started.

lock and key

Sign in to your account.

Account Login

Forgot your password?

AWT RoboBots

Save the date for RoboBots 2014The AWT plans to engage students and generate enthusiasm for manufacturing by hosting the fourth annual AWT RoboBots competition  on April 26, 2014.

Basic information on what the AWT RoboBot Competition is:

2013 AWT RoboBots Competition:

http://youtu.be/C5IOjKFmVrU

What does the school need to do?

  • Identify a “coach” for the team. The coach may be a classroom teacher who chooses to integrate the activity into his or her curriculum through the year, or the coach may be someone who sponsors a robotic team after school. The coach assists the students in designing the robot and its weapons at school. The coach may choose to accompany the students to the industry partner’s location to work on construction outside of school hours. The coach will be asked to attend one planning meeting and attend the actual competition. It is expected that the coach would maintain communication with the industry partner and oversee the team as it relates to planning, maintaining deadlines and constructing a documentation portfolio.
  • Select a team. A competitive team is made up of no more than any ten students between the grades of nine and twelve. (Typically teams are comprised of five to seven students). However, an entire classroom of students may be involved in preparing for the actual battle.
  • Get connected to an Industry Partner. Many industry partners have already been identified in Lake County. The partners and sponsors pay the full cost of the robot and the competition. The team and coach just need to be ready to battle.

What’s in it for the students?

Students will be afforded the opportunity to participate in a unique experiential learning experience. This hands-on career exploration opportunity will allow them to truly experience what it means to work in manufacturing. Students will leave this experience with an increased awareness of the careers available to them and the educational opportunities linked to those careers. They will work alongside- not watch, work alongside engineers and machinists on the manufacturing floor. In addition they will develop relationships with industry partners that can lead to internship and career opportunities. As a result the students will be able to develop both technical and “soft” skills.

Technical Skills

  • Design
  • Blueprint reading
  • Tooling
  • Fabrication
  • Budgeting
  • Analysis of manufacturability
  • Adapt to varied roles, jobs responsibilities, schedules and context
  • Work effectively in a climate of ambiguity and changing priorities
  • Incorporate feedback effectively
  • Deal positively with praise, setbacks and criticism
  • 21st Century Learning Skills*, Business Literacy Skills & Flexibility and Adaptability Skills

Initiative & Self-Direction

  • Manage goals and time
  • Work Independently
  • Be Self-directed Learners

Social & Cross-Cultural Skills

  • Work Effectively in Diverse Teams

Productivity & Accountability

  • Set and meet goals, even in the face of obstacles and competing pressure
  • Prioritize, plan and manage work to achieve the intended result

Demonstrate additional attributes associated with producing high quality products including the abilities to:

  • Work positively and ethically
  • Manage time and projects effectively
  • Multitask
  • Participate actively, as well as be reliable and punctual
  • Present oneself professionally and with proper etiquette
  • Collaborate and cooperate effectively with teams
  • Respect and appreciate team diversity
  • Be accountable for results

Leadership & Responsibilty

  • Leverage strengths of others to accomplish a common goal
  • Inspire others to reach their very best via example and selflessness
  • Demonstrate integrity and ethical behavior in using influence and power

*Taken from the Partnership for 21st Century Learning Skills, http://www.p21.org

What’s in it for the school?

Battling Robots provides a framework for schools and businesses to form a mutually beneficial relationship. The businesses benefit from the enthusiasm this project generates regarding manufacturing and the school benefits by growing a local business advocate for the school.

What’s in it for the teacher?

The coach will receive all of the support materials necessary to implement this project in his or her classroom or as a “club” experience. In addition, the teacher now has a community resource on which to call to help connect the students with what they are doing in the classroom to what they might do in the workplace. Industry partners can serve as classroom speakers, host field trips, and help teachers think of innovative ways to make use of local manufactures in enhance the implementation of the current curriculum. We are currently looking into the possibility of graduate credit for teacher participation in the Battling Robots competition.

How do I find out more?

Please contact Alyson Scott at 440.951.5200 or Alyson.Scott@Fredon.com if you have any questions about your school’s participation.

Follow this link, www.gonrl.org, to find out more about the competition and the requirements for the competition. The AWT will be follows the National Robotics League’s rules and regulations.

For more information on the National Robotics League, visit their website www.gonrl.org

 

ThumbSniper-Plugin by Thomas Schulte